parislemon
Because it’s tiny. Both Symbian and Blackberry have more users than Windows Phone.

Markus “Notch” Persson, founder of Minecraft, speaking to Reuters last June about why they weren’t focused on creating the game for Microsoft’s mobile platform. We’ll see if $2.5 billion changes that. My hunch? Um, yes. (via parislemon)

Notch is outspoken and will no longer be involved post-acquisition. He made Minecraft incredible with broad, often clumsy strokes, it got too large and unwieldy to appeal to him, and he went back to experimenting and being opinionated on twitter.

Microsoft might create Minecraft for Windows Phone, but I think it will be an afterthought, a consequence of what they do with Mojang. I’d watch the Minecraft Launcher, that little screen that comes up before you actually start Minecraft. A little tinkering here and there, and you’ve got yourself a version of Steam that’s baked right into Windows, geared more toward kids and casual gamers.

I like Steam, but there’s a lot wrong with it, and it’s a huge target. If you could make downloading, playing, and buying/renting a game a seamless experience on Windows, you’ll win over PC gamers.

Mojang gives you 54 million users right off the bat. That’s pretty incredible. This acquisition is not about changing a video game or porting it to some (admittedly still obscure) platform. This is about access to 54 million gamers.

npr
nprplays:

With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.
What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.
Photo Credit:  Miles Willis/Getty Images for Ascot Racecourse

nprplays:

With Minecraft, Microsoft Buys A Doorway To Millions Of Players

Since its release, Minecraft has become that doorway for a great many players of all ages and demographics, especially those that might not label themselves as a “gamer.” Like Farmville or Candy Crush, it is entry-level gaming. Minecraft is casual; there are no explosions or politics or machismo-heavy protagonists. You are in control of its world and it is only as difficult as you want to make it.

What Microsoft has essentially done is buy a very popular doorway. As new players enter the world of video games through Minecraft, either in its current or possible future versions, Microsoft will now be the doorman ushering that player into its game room instead of the competition’s.

Photo Credit:  Miles Willis/Getty Images for Ascot Racecourse